Day 9

Our Landmark Home and Land Company Experience

 

Roof Sheathing

Roof Sheathing

Friday saw us all up bright and early to get the roof sheathing ply on.

The crew were able to get the first row up very quickly as only the last piece required cutting to size. If you look closely, you can see little metal clips at the upper edge of each board. These are required to hold the next board in place and also maintain a slight gap for appropriate ventilation.

 

Ripping Station

Ripping Station

With the first row complete, most of the subsequent panels required cutting to fit.

The crew set up a “ripping” station on the second floor, where Jim used his expertize to cut 8×4 ply panels to size, ready for lifting up to Hollywood, Pat and Mick on the roof trusses.

 

 

Roof Trusses

Roof Trusses

 

After a little while, Jim handed ripping duties over to Pat. Here he is carefully handing a sheet cut to size up to Hollywood.

It’s around 8:30AM; things are going pretty fast.

 

Chimney Framing

Chimney Framing

Jim turned his attention to the chimney framing where our design required a 6 in 12 (45°) mini “roof” to be constructed to make the aesthetics work between the wide first floor aspect of the chimney and the half-as-wide section that reaches above the roof.

Here you can see Jim nailing some 1/2″ ply to his mini roof frame.

Last Panel

Last Panel

 

By noon it’s time for the last panel to be slotted in place and nailed securely.

Notice the gaps between rows of ply sheet showing narrow strips of loght. These are the ventilation areas set by the clips that were mentioned earlier.

 

 

Roofers

Roofers

In a wonderfully serendipidous flow of events, Andy, our roofer, showed up almost immediately and started laying roofing paper so fast I could hardly get on the mobile home roof quick enough to catch him before he had finished the first row.

You can’t quite see them in this phot but Andy is wearing tennis shoes to minimize the chance of him slipping off the roof!

"Drying In"

“Drying In”

While Andy finishes off “drying in” the house (he did it in 30 mintues, by the way), the crew celebrate reaching with milestone in the process with a beer or two and the swapping of building stories.

Note Elizabeth, purse in hand, asking Jim questions, as usual, while Mick shows how big the one that got away was. Eight days of work to dry-in – good going!

 

NEXT –> Day 10